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37 1/2 Forrester Street Newburyport, MA 01950
978-463-8881
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We all understand that physical activity and exercise are integral components of a healthy lifestyle – as if it isn’t common sense, we’re constantly told this by health-minded organizations. Unfortunately, with increased activity comes an increased risk of injury – this is what brings most people (and maybe even you) to Active Life Chiropractic. Now don’t get confused, you’re not going to have more injuries solely because you’re more active (actually, it’s the other way around) -- like a bicycle or a car, the human body is a machine that requires maintenance and repair and if you don’t maintain it, then you enter the realm of possibility for that machine to breakdown.

Often times, patients present to the office with pain in a particular region, lets just use the low back as an example – there is most likely a damaged structure in the low back that generates pain but it is also likely that there is a poor movement pattern that caused this structure to give. You may not move well through your hips and so you substituting low back movement for a movement that should be coming from your hips. Often times it’s not the tightest but, the weakest structure that gives. If you don’t maintain good hip movement through mobility and flexibility exercises then, you’re predisposing yourself to low back pain.

Just like any marvel of engineering, the human body has many parts that may seem independent but are actually interdependent on the movements of connecting regions. So, while you can expect your low back to get treated and experience pain relief from this, the Active Life approach emphasizes identifying factors (such as poor hip movement) that helped to generate your current condition. Dr. Palombo does this through an integrative functional assessment of the way you move. Unlike a bridge, the human body moves – a ton!—and this is why a static assessment of a functional structure is simply not enough

Many people present with a previous history of mini-episodes of the pain that they now have (only worse). Maybe they enjoyed the transient pain relief offered by anti-inflammatory medications and muscle relaxants in the past but, never asked themselves these questions – Why did my pain develop? Will it come back? What did I do to change the function of my structure so that it won’t come back? I urge you to get these questions answered through a function based approach and, in this way, promote longevity in your capacity to exercise and lead an Active Life. 

 

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